What's On

Saturday, January 26, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Sunday, January 27, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Monday, January 28, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Friday, February 01, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Saturday, February 02, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

  • RHS Garden Rosemoor

    Snowdrop Weekend - RHS Garden Rosemoor

    Join us for RHS Garden Rosemoor’s Snowdrop Weekend when we celebrate these early harbingers of spring. There will be specialist nurseries (Elworthy Cottage Plants on Saturday and Avon Bulbs on Sunday), free guided walks covering not only snowdrops but early spring-flowering bulbs too plus a free, illustrated talk each day on Snowdrops in the Wild by alpine specialists Bob and Rannveig Wallis. This is the perfect event for both expert galanthophiles and visitors who simply appreciate these shy but stunning early spring flowers. 

Sunday, February 03, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

  • RHS Garden Rosemoor

    Snowdrop Weekend - RHS Garden Rosemoor

    Join us for RHS Garden Rosemoor’s Snowdrop Weekend when we celebrate these early harbingers of spring. There will be specialist nurseries (Elworthy Cottage Plants on Saturday and Avon Bulbs on Sunday), free guided walks covering not only snowdrops but early spring-flowering bulbs too plus a free, illustrated talk each day on Snowdrops in the Wild by alpine specialists Bob and Rannveig Wallis. This is the perfect event for both expert galanthophiles and visitors who simply appreciate these shy but stunning early spring flowers. 

Monday, February 04, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Thursday, February 07, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.

Friday, February 08, 2019

  • Events

    Torbay Royal Regatta - Torbay - Events

    One of the most popular events on the English Riviera and great fun for all the family

    Find out more

  • Torquay Museum

    FATAL FLU: SPANISH FLU AND THE THREAT OF PANDEMIC - Torquay Museum

    Rapidly spreading and killing millions, the so called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 was the most deadly pandemic in human history. Fatal Flu: Spanish Flu and the Threat of Pandemic, an exciting new project run by Torquay Museum and funded by Wellcome, will explore the personal stories behind this deadly virus and showcase a new and fascinating exhibition.

    Striking like a lethal lottery there was no way to predict who would succumb to this killer virus. Although no one knows for sure it has been estimated that around 500 million people were infected by the Spanish Flu and up to 100 million people died.

    The pandemic struck in 1918 while the world was still in the grip of the biggest war it had ever known. There was great public grief about the war, and to an extent there still is in the commemorations which are held every year. The flu is thought to have killed more people than both world wars combined but it is not remembered in the same way, possibly partially due to the private nature of grief from an illness.

    Wellcome, which funds the Fatal Flu exhibition, exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. They’re a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. They support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate.